THE DISAPPEARING SPOON – Giveawy / Review

This Giveaway is now CLOSED
From the Publisher:

The Periodic Table is one of man’s crowning scientific achievements. But it’s also a treasure trove of stories of passion, adventure, betrayal, and obsession. The infectious tales and astounding details in THE DISAPPEARING SPOON follow carbon, neon, silicon, and gold as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, war, the arts, poison, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them.

We learn that Marie Curie used to provoke jealousy in colleagues’ wives when she’d invite them into closets to see her glow-in-the-dark experiments. And that Lewis and Clark swallowed mercury capsules across the country and their campsites are still detectable by the poison in the ground. Why did Gandhi hate iodine? Why did the Japanese kill Godzilla with missiles made of cadmium? And why did tellurium lead to the most bizarre gold rush in history?

From the Big Bang to the end of time, it’s all in THE DISAPPEARING SPOON. 

About the Author:

Sam Kean is a writer in Washington, D.C. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Mental Floss, Slate, The Believer, Air & Space, Science, and The New Scientist. He is currently working as a reporter at Science magazine and as a 2009 Middlebury Environmental Journalism fellow.

My Review:
I liked this one.
Kean takes lots of previously dull information
(to me anyway)
and makes it  INTERESTING!
He does this by using language that 
I can understand:-)
and adding tidbits of history
and a little humor now and then.
Textbooks that are written like this,’
would make learning so much more fun.
Double thumbs up for The Disappearing Spoon.

Thanks to Ann and Hachette,
I have 2 copies that I can give away.

Here are the Rules:
Giveaway open to residents of the US and Canada
Hachette will not Send to P.O. Box Addresses

To Enter – leave a comment telling me what your favorite 
subject was, in school.
Make sure to leave a valid email address with your comment.
Extra Entries
+1 Retweet – can be done once each day – leave a link.
+2 Follow me on Twitter – leave your Twitter ID
+3 Follow me on Networked Blogs


Giveaway ends at Noon Central 
September 20th

Good Luck & Good Reading
 

Audio and Video

THE DISAPPEARING SPOON – Giveawy / Review

You May Also Like

0 thoughts on “THE DISAPPEARING SPOON – Giveawy / Review

  1. One of my favourite subjects in school was algebra.
    This book sounds so interesting I would love to win it.

    cenya2 at hotmail dot com

  2. English Lit was always my favorite. I never cared for the grammar part. But oh how I loved and still love to read.

    giveawaymommy at yahoo.com

  3. Art and English were my faves

    +2 Follow on twitter @throuthehaze

    +3 Follow on Networked Blogs-Rae Pavey

    throuthehaze at gmail dot com

  4. I enjoyed math in school, at least until I hit geometry! I also really liked biology. But I always loved english the best. As I advanced in school, this subject improved more anf more because in high school I was assigned good books to read and we discussed them in class. And in college, of course, there were electives in my major which was english, of course! lol

    This book seems to combine the best, or at least good parts of several subjects: english, math & science. And if I don't enjoy the book as much as I think I will, I know my husband will love it!

    Thank you for hosting this giveaway!
    ~ Amy
    Aimala127 AT gmail DOT com

  5. My favorite subject in school was math with science a close second. Maybe that is why I am a high school math teacher today. This book sounds fascinating, and I would so love to win one of the copies being given away.

    Thank you,

    Christine
    [email protected]

  6. My fave subject in high school was honors English (a combo of English Lit, History and Art History) team-taught and quite fun. In college it was Political Science. Just finished the book from the library but would LOVE my own copy. I'll follow you on Twitter shortly. On Twitter, I'm Aradia53.

    Nice to see another non-scientist woman who found the book as interesting as I did. I'm 57 years old and happy to know I can still learn stuff!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *